Missouri Senior Report 2013

For general information about indicators and measures used in Senior Report, please refer to the FAQ page.

Outcome Indicators

Economic well-being

Importance: Having adequate financial resources is correlated with better quality of life for seniors. Moreover, those who have economic means are less reliant on public assistance.

Median household income 65-74
The median average household income, in dollars, of seniors aged 65 to 74. Household income is a direct measure of liquid assets. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Median household income 75+
The median average household income, in dollars, of seniors age 75 and older. Household income is a direct measure of liquid assets. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Average household income 65-74
The annual average household income, in dollars, of seniors aged 65 to 74. Household income is a direct measure of liquid assets. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Average household income 75+
The annual average household income, in dollars, of seniors age 75 and older. Household income is a direct measure of liquid assets. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Median value owner-occupied housing unit
The median value, in dollars, of owner-occupied housing of seniors. The ownership of a house represents a significant asset for most seniors, and the relative value of housing is a useful indicator of both seniors’ and community assets. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Persons for whom poverty status is defined 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Persons below poverty level 65+
The number of seniors who are living in poverty. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent persons below poverty level 65+
The percent of seniors who are living in poverty. The proportion of seniors living in poverty is a direct measure of economic need. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Total number of Missouri income tax returns
Source: MO Dept. of Revenue
Number of Missouri income tax returns with "yourself" checked for "age 65 or older"
Source: MO Dept. of Revemue
Number of Missouri income tax returns with filing status "single"
Source: MO Dept. of Revenue
Number of Missouri income tax returns with filing status "single" and "yourself" checked for "age 65 or older"
Source: MO Dept. of Revenue
Filing jointly, 65+
The percent of seniors living in households where head of household did not file as "single". Because census measures of single person households are not available annually, the percentage of seniors filing joint Missouri income tax returns was used to gauge household composition. Source: Division of Taxation & Collection, MO Dept. of Revenue
Percent filing Missouri joint income tax returns, 65+
The percent of seniors living in households where head of household did not file as "single". Source: Division of Taxation & Collection, MO Dept. of Revenue, 2007
SSI payments as percent of total personal income, 65+
A relative index of economic well-being was created by calculating SSI payments as a percentage of total personal income. Supplemental security income (SSI) payments are income-based benefits available to seniors and persons with disabilities. Source: US Bureau of Economic Analysis
Crude estimate of personal net worth, per capita
Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Workforce participation

Importance: Senior participation in the workforce may be viewed as either an adverse or a positive outcome. An adverse view may result if seniors work because of economic necessity and would prefer to be fully retired. If, however, seniors want to remain economically and socially engaged and are employed in jobs that do not require strenuous physical activity, the outcome can be viewed as positive.

Persons in workforce, 65+
Source: MO Dept. of Economic Development, Local Employment Dynamics
Percent of seniors working for pay, 65+
The percent of persons aged 65 or over in a county working for wages as calculated by averaging the number of seniors working for wages during each quarter of the year. Source: The Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Program, Center for Economic Studies, US Census Bureau
Average monthly earnings, 65+
Source: MO Dept. of Economic Development, Local Employment Dynamics

Economic contribution

Importance: Seniors spend a great deal of their money locally, and frequently at higher rates than people younger than 65.

Economic impact index
The percent of total estimated household expenditures in a county attributable to seniors 65 and older. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; Consumer Expenditure Survey, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Housing

Importance: The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) considers families who pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing as "cost burdened"; these families may have difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing, transportation and medical care. Seniors living on fixed incomes are particularly vulnerable to fluctuations in housing costs.

Total occupied housing units
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent total occupied housing units
Source: US Census Bureau
Total occupied housing units 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent total occupied housing units 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Owner-occupied housing units
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent owner-occupied housing units
Source: US Census Bureau
Owner-occupied housing units 65+
The number of persons 65 years old and older living in owner-occupied housing. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent owner-occupied housing units 65+
The percent of seniors living in owner-occupied housing. Seniors' housing needs are more likely to be met if they live in owner-occupied housing. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Renters, 65+
Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Renters paying 30% or more household income on housing costs, 65+
Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent renters, 65+, paying 30% or more household income on housing costs, 65+
Owners, 65+
Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Owners paying 30% or more household income on housing costs, 65+
Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent owners paying 30% or more household income on housing costs, 65+
Renters & owners, 65+
Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Renters & owners paying 30% or more household income on housing costs, 65+
The percent of seniors who spend 30 percent or more of their monthly income on mortgage payments or rent and utilities combined. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent renters & owners paying 30% or more household income on housing costs, 65+
The percent of seniors who spend 30 percent or more of their monthly income on mortgage payments or rent and utilities combined. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)

Transportation

Importance: Transportation is necessary in order to obtain goods and services and to participate in work and social activities. Whether seniors have the capacity to meet their transportation needs is often measured by how many hold a valid driver's license. Transportation needs are also likely to vary, depending on the availability of mass transit. Whatever transportation arrangements seniors make, the lack of a driver's license in Missouri indicates that transportation is an issue.

Persons with Missouri driver's license, 65+
Source: MO Dept. of Revenue
Percent persons with Missouri driver's license, 65+
The percent of seniors with a valid Missouri driver's license. Source: Division of Motor Vehicle and Drivers Licensing, MO Dept. of Revenue

Household composition

Importance: Seniors who live with someone are less likely to be socially isolated and are more likely to have companionship and assistance. Consequently, household composition is an important indicator for seniors' well-being.

Population living in families 65+
The number of seniors living in families. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent population living in families 65+
The percent of seniors living in families. Family life enhances the senior population's well-being. Seniors who live alone are more likely to be socially isolated and at greater risk of accidental injury and physical and mental illness. The census defines families as two or more related persons living in the same household. Persons residing in single person households are not reported as "families". Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Female householder, no husband present 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent female householder, no husband present 65+
Source: US Census Bureau

Civic engagement

Importance: Seniors contribute to their communities through a wide range of civic, humanitarian and religious volunteer activities.

Senior voter registration and participation index
The percent of seniors who were registered to vote or voted in an election during past year. Capturing civic engagement activities consistently across counties and over time remains a challenge. However, we can know the degree to which seniors participate in the most fundamental of democratic activities - voting. Source: MO Secretary of State
Registered voters, 65+
Source: MO Tax Commission
Voted last year, 65+
Source: MO Tax Commission
Percent voted last year, 65+
Source: MO Tax Commission

Long-term care

Importance: Long-term care represents a significant health care cost for seniors, who tend to have limited incomes, as well as for the state of Missouri because of MO HealthNet (Medicaid).

Medicaid paid claims for in-home care services, 65+
Source: MO Dept. of Social Services
Medicaid paid claims for nursing facility services, 65+
Source: MO Dept. of Social Services
Medicaid costs for long-term care, per 1,000 persons
Total Medicaid dollars spent on in-home and residential long-term care services per capita. The number and value of long-term care insurance policies would be a useful measure for this indicator. However, that information is not reported by county. The rate of Medicaid spending for long-term care per capita shows the trend, if not the full expense, of such services. Because both health care costs and the percentage of people eligible for Medicaid vary greatly by county, this indicator is not used in the construction of the overall county index of senior well-being. Source: MO HealthNet Division, MO Department of Social Services
Average Medicaid costs for persons, 65+
Source: MO Dept. of Social Services

Safety

Importance: Understanding the relationship between seniors and safety is complicated. As with all populations, seniors are at risk of becoming victims of property and violent crimes. However, seniors who are physically or psychologically vulnerable are at increased risk of suffering financial exploitation, accidents and abuse.

Crude crime rate for property & violent crime, per 1,000 persons
Source: MO Highway Patrol
Violent crimes
Source: MO Highway Patrol
Property crimes
Source: MO Highway Patrol
Senior abuse/neglect cases reported
Source: MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services
Senior abuse/neglect cases reported, per 10,000 persons
Source: MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services
Crime and senior abuse, per 1,000 persons
The number of property and violent crimes and senior abuse hotline calls per 1,000 persons. While crime data by age of victim is unavailable, we can measure the overall crime rate in a county. For the safety indicator, we included cases of abuse and neglect as reported through the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services' Elder Abuse and Neglect Hotline. These combined data sources are reported as an indexed rate per 1,000 persons. Source: The Missouri Statistical Analysis Center, MO Highway Patrol, MO Dept. of Public Safety

Health status (moving totals/averages)

Importance: Health status affects seniors' ability to engage in social and community activities, economic expenditures, risk for safety concerns, quality of life, and life expectancy. Note: available data are aggregated over 3-year periods.

Hospitalizations & ER visits for diabetes
The number of hospital and emergency room visits made per 10,000 seniors regarding diabetes and issues associated with diabetes. Source: Data, Surveillance Systems, & Statistical Reports, MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services, 2005-2007
Hospitalizations & ER visits for diabetes, per 10,000 seniors (rate)
The number of hospital and emergency room visits made per 10,000 seniors regarding diabetes and issues associated with diabetes; data are reported as an average over a three-year period. Selecting one health status measure for the senior population is particularly difficult because of the wide range of health issues confronting seniors. Tracking diabetes-related care is a valuable proxy for health status because (a) the number of cases by county is sufficient to produce a reliable rate; (b) diabetes is related to many other health problems; and (c) effective preventive measures can reduce the incidence of diabetes and other chronic health conditions. Source: Data, Surveillance Systems, & Statistical Reports, MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services
Hospitalizations & ER visits for heart disease
Source: MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services
Hospitalizations & ER visits for heart disease, per 10,000 seniors (rate)
Source: MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services

Health care access

Importance: Health care access is essential for the overall well-being of seniors. Reliable, convenient access to primary care increases the capacity of seniors to live independently. Primary care physicians frequently serve a demographically diverse patient base. However, primary care specialties are typically defined as: family practice, family medicine, general practice, internal medicine, general surgery, gynecology/obstetrics, and pediatrics.

Full-time primary-care physicians
Source: MO Dept. of Health & Senior Services
Full-time primary-care physicians, per 1,000 seniors
The number of unique registered medical providers who wrote medical prescriptions that were filled, expressed as a rate of primary care physicians per 1,000 seniors. The most recent year in which we were able to collect data in which necessary variables that match professional registration and BNDD data was 2008; the ability to construct this match is crucial in identifying actual practice locations for physicians. As a result, we cannot obtain more current values to update these data for the current report. Although there are a broader range of providers that address seniors' health care needs (e.g., dentists, nurses, and allied health professionals), there is no singular source for these data. However, efforts are underway to collaboratively build a system that would accurately track healthcare workforce data. Source: MO Division of Professional Registration database; MO Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD) data

Status Indicators

Demographics

Importance: An analysis of demographic data allows community leaders and service providers to assess population trends and to plan for the community's future needs.

Total population (all)
Total population. Source: Table 2a. Projected Population of the United States, by Age and Sex: 2000 to 2050, "U.S. Interim Projections by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin," US Census Bureau
Population 65+
A measure of the total population that is 65 years old or older. Source: Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population by Sex and Five-Year Age Groups for the United States. Population Division, US Census Bureau
Percent population 65+
The percent of the total population that is 65 years old or older. Source: Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population by Sex and Five-Year Age Groups for the United States. Population Division, US Census Bureau
Female population 65+
Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Percent female population 65+
The percent of seniors that are female. Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Male population 65+
Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Percent male population 65+
The percent of seniors that are male. Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Population 85+
Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Percent population 85+
The percent of the total population that is 85 years old or older. Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Female population 85+
Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Percent female population 85+
The percent of persons 85 years old or older that are female. Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Male population 85+
Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Percent male population 85+
The percent of persons 85 years old or older that are male. Source: NCHS Bridged Estimates, US Census Bureau
Noninstitutionalized population 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent noninstitutionalized population 65+
Source: US Census Bureau

Quality of life

Importance: Quality of life is critical in helping seniors to be productive and live in economic security.

No high school diploma 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent no high school diploma 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
High school graduate or GED 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent high school graduate or GED 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Some college, no degree, 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
Percent some college, no degree, 65+
Source: US Census Bureau
College graduate, 65+
The number of seniors with a college degree or higher. Seniors with a higher education generally tend to fare better on household and community wealth, and well-being. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Percent college graduate, 65+
The percent of seniors with a college degree or higher. Seniors with a higher education generally tend to fare better on household and community wealth, and well-being. Source: American Community Survey, US Census Bureau; OSEDA ACS Estimates (for counties <65K population)
Number of SNAP recipients, 60+
The number of persons age 60 or older who receive SNAP (formerly known as Food Stamps). Source: MO Dept. of Social Services
Percent of SNAP recipients, 60+
The percent of persons age 60 or older who receive SNAP (formerly known as Food Stamps). Source: MO Dept. of Social Services

Health and wellness

Importance: The health and wellness of Missouri seniors can be gauged in several ways. This report focuses on seven indicators of long-term health and wellness that can be influenced by preventative practices and public health interventions. Because of variations in sample size and response rates at the county level, age-cohort specific reporting may vary from state-level estimates.

Percent persons who were smokers in past 12 months, 65+
The percent of seniors who are current smokers. Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons having no exercise in past month, 65+
The percent of seniors who responded that they had not performed some sort of non-work related exercise during the past month. Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons overweight (body mass index 25-30), 65+
The percent of seniors who have a body mass index (BMI) between 25-30 (overweight). Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons with obesity (body mass index >30), 65+
The percent of seniors who have a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 (obese). Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons with high blood pressure, 65+
The percent of seniors who have been told they have high blood pressure by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional. Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons with high cholesterol, 65+
The percent of seniors who have had their cholesterol checked and have been told by a doctor, nurse, or other health professional that it was high. Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons with diabetes, 65+
Percent persons having no flu shot in past year, 65+
Percent persons having no mammography in past year, 65+
The percent of senior females who have not had a mammogram in the past year. Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services
Percent persons having no sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in past decade, 65+
The percent of seniors who responded that they have not had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy exam in the past 10 years. Source: County-Level Study, Community Profiles. MO Dept. of Health and Senior Services